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Cycle Touring the Western Ghats

I have had a great time recounting my bike tour from Bangalore and Chitradurga via Hampi and the beaches of Mangalore on the West coast of India.  Today we continue from the coast through the mountains on the fourth and final post of this series.

Having left the coastline behind, the ride from Kollur to Agumbe was lovely! I passed through the forests and wildlife sanctuaries of the Western Ghats and the entire route is well canopied with trees making it a very comfortable and enjoyable ride. The last climb to Agumbe was tough and I could manage only 10 km in two hours. But totally worth it as I saw Rat Snakes, Lion Tailed Macaques and Malabar Squirrels. I was seeing Lion Tailed Macaques for the first time in the wild as they are pretty rare and difficult to spot. What a win!

LTM panorama

By T. R. Shankar Raman (Own work) [GFDL or CC BY 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Agumbe was cool and refreshing and the Hotelier I met there was a real friendly guy. I didn’t have enough money in my pocket and the nearest ATM was 20 km away. The hotelier said no problem! Pay me the next time you are here! Wow! The warmth and hospitality was incredible. This attitude of warmth and hospitality, I have experienced in India and also around the world from the most unexpected sources. It is a good reminder not to judge people by their looks and to have faith in the goodness of people. We have got to learn to look beyond what the exterior has to offer. But I digress.

Anyway, Agumbe is perhaps one of the most beautiful spots in the Western Ghats. The heavy rainfall it receives has created a unique micro-ecosystem, similar to that of tropical evergreen forest and a home for the King Cobras! – the world’s longest venomous snakes. They grow up to lengths of 18.5 to 18.8 ft (5.6 to 5.7 m). Fortunately these snakes dislike us as much as we might dislike them. Lucky!

Just outside town, there are some beautiful trails for trekking and are the waterfalls a worth a visit. After spending one night in Agumbe, I rode towards Chikmagalur district the next day. I passed the town of Balehonnur which is located on the banks of river Bhadra and entered the coffee belt of India. The coffee belt is an amazing trail to be riding on and apart from coffee, arecanut, paddy, vanilla and other spices are cultivated here as well.

The winding roads with the beautifully canopied trees makes the region cool and lovely. There is nothing but lush greenery all around you and the plantations stretch endlessly. In between the plantations there are patches of reserve forests with thick undergrowth and sometimes infested with Lantana bushes. And also amidst all the coffee plantations, you might see small patches of tea plantations too. Tea plantations appear like a lush green carpet, while coffee is more of a dense jungle. The coffee and tea plantation next to each other make a beautiful contrast and a touch of beauty to the already lovely landscape.

After travelling for a month and staying in budget places, I decided that a little bit of comfort was not going to do any harm. Hence, near Balur, I decided on spending the night in a lovely home stay called Villa Urvinkhan. Perched on top of a hill in the middle of a coffee plantation, they have a great pool from which one can see miles over pristine forests. I could not have asked for more! 

The cottages were amidst coffee plantations and I woke up early in the morning and at the horizon, I could mist covered hills that made the peaks appear as if they were snow capped. The luxury of being nowhere!  

I left after two beautiful nights at this homestay and then rode towards Chikmaglur town and headed to Halliberri Homestay. Around 20kms from Chikmaglur town, this home stay consists of two quaint cottages amidst an oasis of greenery. At times Halliberri is pronounced Halle Berry which I think is very funny! Outside the homestay on the main road, there is a simple coffee shop which also functions as a small restaurant. Here too I experienced great hospitality and I was well taken care of. From here, I decided to head towards Coorg.

As this is home terrain, I stopped for two nights at a friend’s place in Sakleshpur. I attended the annual car rally nearby, which was great and then bid farewell to my friend. Another two days of cycling and I reached safely at Siddapur where I finished this epic cycle tour that took me to across Karnataka and Goa.

Over all, it was a fabulous journey and I guess the finest moments of my ride was when I cycling through the Western Ghats. The roads were under the cool shade of trees and the landscape was breathtaking and bountiful. Just incredible!

Copyright Art of Bicycle Trips-India Western Ghats Birdlife starling-706732

The Western Ghats must be seen and experience to be believed. When you spend some time here, you will realize how nature has shaped these parts of India and how nature continues to contribute to the unique customs, traditions and cuisines here as compared to the more exposed parts along the coastline on the other side of the hills. I’m certain I’ll cycle these parts again sometime. Come along. 

Author: Poonacha

Editor: Ashwini

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Cycle Touring the Konkan Coast

There I was in Karwar after cycling solo across Karnataka and through Hampi and Goa. On Entering Karwar you cross a huge bridge over river Kali as it enters into the sea. A spectacular view opens up and in the sea you see a couple of islands all thickly wooded and some even have resorts and beaches with restricted access. Again Karwar is a coastal city with nothing much to offer. The main highway divides the sea and the beach from the town and the beach is known as Tagore beach.

Apparently Tagore stayed here for many weeks and wrote very highly of the beach of Karwar. Tagore’s poetic description of the beach is a reminder of how beautiful it must have been once upon a time. You can still glimpse some of the beauty when you look into the sea and spot the lovely islands out there over the waters.

There is a small trek into the hills from the eastern side of the Karwar. On top of the town there is a village called Guddadahalli. Guddadahalli in Karwar is a village with no roads and is a 5km walk from the town. Around 80 families referred to as Hallaki Gowdas live here and they are all engaged in agriculture. Life is hard for these people as they have to walk 10 km up and down at least each day to access the town. However, the walk up the hill is beautiful offering great views of the sea and valley below. The view of top is even better as it overlooks the town below and you can see the sea clearly.

Arabian sea from Sadashivgarh fort

By Ayan Mukherjee (Own work) [CC BY 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

I spent a good week in Karwar after which I set forth on next part of my South India cycle tour to the holy town of Gokarna. Once I reached Gokarna, I decided to spend some time here to enjoy the seascapes that us land locked city dwellers don’t often see. It is a great place to relax and I got a nice ‘ayurvedic’ massage while I was there to relieve my aching body.

The town of Gokarna is home to a major Shiva temple and is an important pilgrimage centre. So the beaches here attract conservative folks as well as hippies who are escaping the commercialism of Goa.

The beach here is beautiful beyond words and is naturally shaped in the form of an Om which in Sanskrit is written like this:   

A little slice of heaven!

Gokarna to Murudeshwar.

When I finally got going from Gokarna, the weather was quite hot and humid. Cramps used to set in when I cycled and had to keep hydrating myself with a lot of water and salts. Riding along the coast from Gokarna without getting on to the highway was beautiful.

Kodale beach at Gokarna

By Infoayan (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Having passed remote and isolated beaches, I used a boat to cross over from Gokarna towards Bhatkal and Kumta. Bhatkal and Kumta are home to fishing villages along the coastline and a lot of conservative muslim communities live here and you would be hard pressed to find tourists on the beaches here unlike at Goa or Gokarna. At Bhatkal, I saw many old-fashioned houses with beautiful wooden pillars and lovely verandahs.

I arrived in Murudeshwar and settled in for the night at a local hotel. This town attracts a lot of pilgrims thanks to the massive statue of Shiva near the beach. The coast was becoming too hot and the going was getting tougher and hence I took a diversion to the east and headed to the hills to the town of Kollur. Kollur is home to the 1,200 year old Mookambika temple.

The place was clean, the people were well-mannered and respectful and Mookambika temple was a worthwhile visit. There is a dignity of conduct found in this place and serious amount of devotion. Although I lacked the faith displayed by others here, I appreciated the sincerity and dedication nonetheless. I was itching to be on the move, hence I could manage only one day in this place and headed off to Agumbe!  More about my cycling tour through Agumbe here.

Author: Poonacha

Editor: Ashwini

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Cycle Touring from Bangalore to Goa

As somebody who has always loved cycling, I spent my childhood exploring Bangalore on my bicycle. While  eager to do long journeys on a bicycle, fear and hesitation always hindered my desires. What would happen if my cycle broke down? What if I get stuck in the middle of nowhere? Where would I sleep? How could I carry enough bags and supplies? Assessing conditions and limitations, implementing safety measures, choosing the right gear is a crucial part of any bike tour. At Art of Bicycle Trips, I got the opportunity to help others address these challenges. Now long cycling tours are a breeze!

My first cycle tour from Bangalore to Goa in 2011 is one of my most memorable trips. This was in the month of November and we set off with Scott Hybrid bicycles and a total of seven people. Two couples from Canada, Renuka Nayak(Driver) and Sriram and myself(Poonacha) multi-tasking as Bike Tour Guides and Mechanics.

Copyright Art of Bicycle Trips-Cycling Holidays India

Stretched over a period of ten days, this journey was my first long tour and I was glad to have Sriram showing me the ropes. Starting from the outskirts of Bangalore we cycled an average of 60 km per day. We passed through various places of historical and cultural significance as our route was designed to showcase the best monuments and places of interest along the way.

Karnataka is one of the larger states in India and its topography varies beautifully as you traverse through it. The landscape is vivid and diverse and breathtakingly beautiful I must add. A large chunk of the Western Ghats is found in this state. This formidable chain of mountains runs parallel to the West Coast and in these mountain tropical rainforests, with a rich range of flora and fauna, are surrounded by spice plantations, tea estates, rice paddy fields, flowering farms, intricate temples and more. A traveller who has seen other regions of India is bound to realise sooner or later that the state of Karnataka is bountiful and distinct.

As we began our ride on the outskirts of Bangalore, the granite monoliths at Ramanagara offered dramatic panoramic views. It is amazing how with a bit of effort we can enjoy such beauty easily here in India. What a start!

Copyright Art of Bicycle Trips-Cycling Holidays-Photo by Ashwini Ravindranath


In Mysore, The Palace is splendid and it blends together Hindu, Muslim, Rajput, and Gothic styles of architecture in stone with a clock tower and marble domes.

Mysore Palace, India” by Jim Ankan Deka Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

Cycling along the water near Ranganathitu Bird Sanctuary, we caught glimpses that showed us the variety of bird life in India. The boat ride brought us in even closer to the wildlife as we watched the wild mugger marsh crocodiles basking in the sun lazily.

Marsh crocodile india” by Hericks Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

The statue of Bahubali at Shravanabelgola and the erotic sculptures at the Hoysala temples in Belur & Halebeedu seemed scandalous to our clients in the beginning but it also opened their eyes to the varying cultural norms and diversity in the subcontinent.

Shravanabelgola si0928” by G41rn8 Licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

In Chikmagalur district the challenge began – but it was also the most enjoyable part of the ride as the beauty of the Western Ghats revealed itself. The ride to Mullayanagiri, the highest peak in Karnataka, offered breathtaking views of the verdant valleys below.

Copyright Art of Bicycle Trips-Cycling Holidays-Photo by Ashwini Ravindranath


This was followed by the ride to iron-ore mining are of Kemmangundi skirting the fringes of the Bhadra wildlife sanctuary. This once bustling town is now a ghost town albeit one that we love thanks to the forest cover that surrounds it. We then rode on to Banavasi – Land of the Kadamba Dynasty and recognized as the first capital of ancient Karnataka. This temple from the 9th century is considered to be one of India’s holiest shrines and it showcases intricate stone sculptures of which some are made out of monolithic blocks.

Madhukeshwara temple at Banavasi sirsi karnataka” by Ajaya.n.g Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

The rural landscape here is a step back in time. The terrain is interspersed with ancient lakeside temples that have been kept alive to this day by people of different sects.  As we cycled through remote villages and smalls town enroute, we took the sights and sounds of this timeless place then descended to the coast towards Gokarna. The palm fringed waters, salt flats and temples then gave way to sun-kissed white sand beaches that hug the roads.

Bharatha Gudi, Gokarna” by Daniel Hauptstein Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

At Karwar, the border town between Karnataka and Goa, the coastal landscape takes on a distinctly different flavour as Goa was a former Portuguese colony and its culture is starkly different compared to that of Karnataka. The temples gave way to churches and villas and the local cuisine packed in a punch with spicy Cafreals and Vindaloos paired with locally brewed Cashew liquor known as Fenny.

India Goa Vagator Beach“. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

With sunshine, blue skies, the cover of wilderness and cool waves gently lapping at our feet, the Bangalore to Goa bike tour is very special. It displays the multi-faceted nature of India and takes you through some of the most historically, culturally and geographically diverse terrain in the Indian peninsula. You can’t go wrong by choosing this spectacular cycle tour route if you are planning to cycle and travel through Southern India.

Author: Poonacha Cariapa

Editor: Ashwini Ravindranath

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Snapshots from Sikkim

Sikkim – The mountain kingdom. The Land of the mighty Kangchendzonga.

Tucked away in a corner of India on the borders of Tibet, Bhutan and Nepal, this is a gateway to the Himalayas.

Here the birdsongs begin much before dawn and go on until after dusk frenetically, in contrast to the sense of timelessness that emanates in these mountains.

When the mountains call, you drop everything and go. I did just that recently and here are my notes from the road from the Art of Bicycle Trips mission to Bike Sikkim – from Gangtok to Darjeeling – over the course of ten days with ten impressive women.

Art of Bicycle Trips Sikkim Bike Tour

On arrival at Bagdogra, the greenery of the plains that surrounds is striking. We were getting tantalisingly close to some of the world’s tallest mountain peaks and the air was charged with energy and anticipation. The drive to Gangtok took us from the plains through to the hills where the valleys towered all around as the River Teesta snaked its way through. The jade of the forests and the emeralds of the waters enroute were mesmerising.

Soon enough, we were in Gangtok, walking on the highway to Tibet, under the cool shade of the poplars and oaks. Shortly after, we got on our Giant mountain bikes and went riding around Gangtok. The traffic was concentrated around the town’s main thoroughfares. The roads were an assortment of inclines; switchbacks started making their appearances right from the start.

The mountainous terrain brought with it dramatic weather – as always, and the peaks were truant at first – they remained hidden under a veil of mist initially. Then, slowly, as we went about organising the final details for this epic cycling trip of Sikkim, we were treated to majestic views of Mt. Siniolchu and Mt. Kangchendzonga. Breathtaking!

Art of Bicycle Trips - Gangtok Bike Trip Views

There is nothing that compares to cycling along on a seldom used forest road, only to be greeted, out of the blue, by the tranquil melancholy of these magnificent Himalayan peaks. The people of Sikkim consider Kangchendzonga as a guardian deity. The mountain provides everything they need and is worshipped – in line with their ancestral belief that all of nature is holy.

In Gangtok, the Enchey Monastery, the Do-Drul Chorten, the Institute of Tibetology and Directorate of Handicrafts and Handloom are well worth a visit. Having biked to Enchey Gompa, Ganesh Tok and Hanuman Tok, we left from Gangtok to Rumtek satisfied in the knowledge that we had conquered Gangtok’s highest point by bike. The ride was on!

Art of Bicycle Trips - Sikkim Bike Trip Views from the road - Photo by Ashwini Ravindranath

The route from Gangtok to Rumtek is all downhill with potholes more apparent than the road in several places. The landscape slowly transformed from that of the hustle and bustle of Gangtok to that of evergreen forests studded with gushing streams interspersed along which where splendid terraces of paddy fields – vivid in both appearance and hue.

Art of Bicycle Trips - Sikkim Bike Trip - Cycling Gangtok - Photo by Ashwini Ravindranath

Prayers flags fluttered in the breeze as we cycled on to the hotel where we our friendly hosts greeted us on arrival with glasses of delicious ‘lassi’ i.e., sweet yoghurt smoothies. The best day of riding so far!

Art of Bicycle Trips - Sikkim Bike Trip

At Rumtek, a visit to the Rumtek Monastery is highly recommended. The colourful prayer flags contrast the backdrop of the hills splendidly here.

The next morning, clear skies greeted us with the season’s first snow on the mountain peaks in front of us. Pumped, we set out early on towards Temi Tea Gardens. It was smooth going on the roads in this section and the downhill that followed was speedy and exhilarating.

Art of Bicycle Trips - Sikkim Bike Trip Switchback

We had the first flat tyre of the trip here in this section of the ride. It was patched up real quick as everyone took the opportunity to click away and before we knew it, we were on the uphill to Tarku.

Almost everyone’s’ appetite for riding was fully satiated by the time we stopped for lunch at Tarku. Three ladies from the group however were ready for more. So with them free-wheeling it up behind us from Tarku to Temi, we went on to visit the organic Temi  Tea Garden.

Shortly after the end of our tour at the tea plantation, the three remaining ladies accomplished their Peak to Peak ride having ridden all the way from their hotel at Rumtek to the hotel at Temi. The best day of riding, again!

Art of Bicycle Trips - Sikkim Bike Tour Peak to Peal conquerers

We got another early start to ride from Temi to Yuksom. With the lower part of the valley now far below us, we were surrounded by endless slopes of the tea gardens. The carpet of tea soon gave way to tropical and then alpine forests. The roads were woven through it all with vertical mountain faces hanging over us and dropping off below us at some points.

As we pedalled through, clouds rolled in around us over the peaks and valleys, parting time and again as the sun burned through the haze of morning. The route repeatedly climbed gently uphill after which it dipped nicely taking us through the lush countryside almost as if it were a joyride.

Art of Bicycle Trips - Sikkim Cycle Tour Countryside riding - Photo by Ashwini Ravindranath

Rain almost spoiled the whole show but it cleared up quickly and we got back on our bikes to zoom through quaint little towns where the children and the adults stopped to smile, shout even, and wave goodbye. The going got serious as we started the climb to Tashiding, the steep inclines challenging even the best. The best day of riding, yet again!

Art of Bicycle Trips - Sikkim Cycle Tour Monastery Loop - Photo by Ashwini Ravindranath

After a well-earned snack break, we visited the Tashiding monastery before driving over to our hotel at Yuksom. The next day being a rest day, we went out for a walk around Yuksom, up to Dubdi Monastery and also to the Coronation Throne and the Bazaar street before calling it a day and kicking back with some beers.

Not riding all day felt strange however and the next day we were all itching to go. With another early start we bid goodbye to Yuksom and headed on to Pelling wondering what lay in store for us there. Mt. Kabru gave us a glorious farewell although the other mountain peaks were hidden behind the clouds. The peaks made show-stopping appearances as we started gaining speed and heading downhill. The roads stretched on endlessly below our feet.

The mountain sides gave way to rivers and waterfalls that poured down from the higher slopes along the way. Those heading from Yuksom to Pelling should keep an eye out for Kangchendzonga Falls, it is an absolute treat.

The valleys gradually opened up as we cycled through on smooth terrain. As we approached Pelling it looked as if we had left the mountains behind. We finished our ride at the hotel and went on to visit Pemayangtse Monastery and Rabdentse Ruins, both of which are worth visiting if you happen to visit.

Art of Bicycle Trips - Sikkim Cycle Tour Views at Pelling

The next morning Mt. Kangchendzonga stood right ahead as we prepared for the final ride to Jorethang feeling incredulous that the mountain had been there all along and we had not been able to see any of it earlier due to the clouds.

Kangchendzonga – The World’s third highest mountain at 8,586 m/28,169 ft.

Kangchendzonga – The hidden land – From the snows of which the first(Lepcha) man and woman of Sikkim are believed to have been created.

In this ‘happy homeland’ in ‘Sikkim’ where snow leopards and even yetis are said to roam, we were happy and content just to be biking for days on end in great weather conditions on country roads.

The anticipation, the excitement, the effort, the camaraderie, the sense of accomplishment during and after such a mission is unparalleled and one can only hope that there’s more of this in store for us in the future.

Until next time, keep on riding.

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Reviews for Art of Bicycle Trips

There are plenty of reasons why going on a cycling tour is a great idea. Here’s a look at the reasons why you should do one of our bike tours – as described by participants from past multi-day cycling tours organized by Art of Bicycle Trips. You can also find more reviews for Art of Bicycle Trips on the ‘Reviews’ page of our website.

Copyright Art of Bicycle Trips Cycling Holidays Reviews


“We feel we have just experienced the trip of a lifetime! Thank you so much for graciously sharing Kerala with us.

You(Dibin*) are a great ambassador for this beautiful spot on our planet. We so appreciated your attention to details, your organization and focus on safety.

We return home with full hearts and many very special memories.

Wishing you all the best for continued success, happiness and health.”
Nancy and Richard, Classic Kerala – 16th to 26th August 2015

Copyright Art of Bicycle Trips Cycling Holidays Reviews



This has been an absolutely perfect trip. I have so enjoyed every part of it, the riding of course, the camaraderie, learning about India, Indian culture, Kerala, tasting a toddy!

I can’t tell you how much I appreciate your kindness and patience. You are a great tour leader. I appreciate you good humor and openness to all our questions. I truly enjoyed getting to know you a little.

You have a wonderful, beautiful world here and it is a joy to find someone who has sought out what he wants and is happy. You did a great job with putting together the group of guys. A smile comes to my face when I think of you all.

I do hope our paths cross again sometime. I hope this is the first of many trips to India for me..”
Gina, Classic Kerala – 18th to 28th January 2015

Copyright Art of Bicycle Trips Cycling Holidays Reviews
“Thank you for the wonderful trip!”
David and Susan, Classic Kerala – 11th to 21st January 2015
Copyright Art of Bicycle Trips Cycling Holidays Reviews

“Art of Bicycle Trips,

All in all we feel we had a fantastic trip. Cycling is a superior way to experience Kerala!

Our guides as well as our driver were terrific. Very accommodating and informative. Well done!!

There were several highlights but outstanding for us was the Kerala backwaters on Day 2 and the houseboat on Day 8.”
Joe and Shelley, Classic Kerala – November 2013

Customer Reviews-Copyright Art of Bicycle Trips-Kerala Cycling Holidays



Great tour, all round. Very good mix of cycling and sightseeing/activities.


  • Early morning start to cycle while cool
  • Finish cycle early; so can relax in hot time of day and then do other activity late afternoon
  • Try to keep max. gradient to say 10%

Driver – Excellent

Guide – Very good knowledge + explanation

Leader – Great all round”

– Bruce

“Dibin is an excellent guide – thoughtfully assessed how we rode and amended the program to suit. We like the mix of cycling & site seeing, riding 55 km then relaxing on a boat.

The day we rode along the coast from Fort Cochin then  stopped at the boat building yard, fish auction then took a canoe for lunch was excellent. The SGH Earth Hotel were all excellent. A great trip all round.”

– Lindsey
Bruce & Lindsey, Classic Kerala November 2013

Customer Reviews-Copyright Art of Bicycle Trips-Kerala Cycling Holidays
“Dear Dibin, Ramzan + Biju,

Thank you so much for everything! I have had such a brilliant time over the past week and now love cycling! Thank you for putting up with us(sorry we weren’t waiting outside the hotel at 6 a.m 🙂 )

Thanks again for showing me how beautiful Kerala is – I really hope to come back one day.



Thanks so so much for such an amazing experience and being such a fantastic team, you helped me a lot. I know I found it difficult at first but have had a great week and don’t find the uphills as hard any more! 🙂

I also have seen such a beautiful side of Kerala with great people! Thanks Dibin for telling us so much about Kerala and being such a wonderful guide. Hope to come back one day.



Dear all,

Thank you so much for an excellent trip. Sorry I occasionally had to walk uphill but I am very old we all very much enjoyed your calm command of the trip and for giving such insights into India.


Thanks so much for a fantastic experience, I had so much fun, even on the uphill! You were all so helpful and helped to make it so great.



Many many thanks for your good humour and patience. It was a memorable trip for all of us and we all appreciated so much your efforts. Kerala is such a special place and we hope to return again one day.”

With best wishes,

Suzanne and family, Classic Kerala – 22nd to 31st December 2013

There you have it. Check back often for updates to this page. You can check out our Classic Kerala cycling tour here that these folks so thoroughly enjoyed here and you can check out all our cycling tours here.

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My Dream Cycle Tour – Munnar

From a conversation(in malayalam) during a bicycle ride to Munnar –

Villager –  Ningal Munnarilekku cycle chavittukayano? (Are you cycling to Munnar?)
Cyclist – Athe athe (Yes! yes! )
Villager – Ningal adipoli! (You guys are awesome!)

Awesomeness aside, what is it that the hill station Munnar has in store for cyclists you ask?

Standing a 1500+ meters above sea level, with a cooler climate compared to the Keralan coast, conquering the tea carpeted mighty mountains of western ghats on pedal power give you a sense of achievement.
If you love cycling in mountains and you are in Kerala, Munnar is a must to be explored on a bike.

Lets take a virtual ride through Munnar, Kerala and you can see for yourself.

The starting point of the ride is the foothills of western ghats, near the small town of Neriamangalam, along side rubber and pineapple plantations. With an easy start and few downhills to begin with, we get to warm up our legs before slowly hitting the climbs. We cycle through a forested section with bamboo groves and tall trees on one side.

If you are cycling during monsoon or just after, you are welcomed by little waterfalls on the way. Stop by and wash your face and feet in this chilled water flowing from the mountains.

Copyright Art of Bicycle Trips-Kerala Cycling Holidays

A short break at the waterfalls and voila! You are completely refreshed and ready to hit more climbs leading towards Munnar.

Along the way you can see and experience, the Periyar River deep in  the valley, a hydro-electric project, churches, a basket weaving community settlement from neighbouring state of Tamil Nadu, water gushing out through one or more open sluice gates of Kallarkutty dam (if you are biking in August) and few toddy shops serving spicy curries with tapioca. Toddy is a locally brewed alcohol made from coconut or palm flower bud sap. You have to try it when here to know why it is popular in these parts!

Soon you will reach Chithirapuram and that is when you will say “Wow! This is so beautiful.” This is the first stretch of tea plantation that you see. Munnar town is just 6 km away from here.

 Copyright Art of Bicycle Trips-Kerala Cycling Holidays

Munnar is culturally very different from other parts of Kerala. It has a predominant Tamil culture due to the settlement of migrants from Tamil Nadu who came here to work in the plantations.

The story is that the British found it very hard to get people from Kerala to work in tea plantations, so they finally brought in people from Tamil Nadu who where ready to do the hard work and this changed the landscape of Munnar!

To this day, the women from these communities pluck the tea leaves in the estates here while the men work in tea factories that process the leaves. The town of Munnar is quite small and it is packed with people and shops. When in Munnar, you can visit tea museum and learn about the history of Munnar – which is intertwined with that of tea.


Another place you can visit is establishment called Srishti. Srishti was started by TATA group to rehabilitate the physically and mentally challenged children of tea plantation workers.

But hey wait, the ride to Munnar is not complete without cycling to Top Station. A steady climb that takes you to an altitude of 2000 m and to the highest point in Kerala.

If you wish to ride and explore this beautiful part of Kerala by bicycle, be sure to check out the link provided here.

With this third and final post, this series of blog posts that describe Dibin’s dream cycling tour route through Kerala now comes to an end. You can read the first part about cycling Fort Kochi here and the second part about cycling the backwaters of Kerala here.

DSCN1719-Copyright Art of Bicycle Trips-Kerala Cycling Holidays

If you are considering cycling through Kerala, feel free to write to Dibin our Kerala and Sri Lanka bike tour expert classic(at)artofbicycletrips(dot)com for inputs. Cheers!

Author: Dibin

Editor: Ashwini